Evelyn Negri-Albert

EatsbyEve

Here, you’ll find anything and everything food-related. Cooking and experimenting in the kitchen is something that I’ve been doing all my life, and it brings me so much joy to share my (amateur) knowledge with you.

whiskey sour

 

1 serving


I’ve always been a whiskey lover, but I never wanted to drink it in the summer because it felt too heavy for a sultry summer day. A manhattan, an old fashioned… They all felt too familiar to a bitter, winter night. This whiskey sour is the perfect balance between pungent and complex with a hint of sweetness, just enough to cut the bite from the whiskey and citrus (in this case, I used bourbon whiskey).

In this recipe, though, I coped a little trick I found while visiting Toronto. I ordered a whiskey sour at a bar, and the bartender asks, “Do you want that with an egg white?” Honestly, I was sort of grossed out. Egg whites. Raw. In a drink. That I’ll be drinking. IN my drink. Not sure about it, but I’m always ready to try something new. So, I went for it, and I’ve been addicted ever since! It gives the cocktail such a frothy head (think of the froth at the top of a beer) that it almost makes it a bit fluffy.

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WHAT YA NEED:

  • 2 oz. bourbon whiskey (or whatever whiskey you prefer, I usually go for middle-shelf stuff)

  • 1.25 oz. freshly squeezed lemon juice

  • 1.25 oz. simple syrup

  • 1 egg white

  • ice

TOOLS:

  • cocktail shaker

  • hawthorne strainer

  • small, fine-mesh strainer

  • jigger

  • coupe glass

Hawthorne strainer

Hawthorne strainer

Fine-mesh strainer

Fine-mesh strainer

HOW TO DO IT:

1. You want to start by making your simple syrup. You can buy it in-store already made, but I honestly recommend just making it yourself. It’s called simple syrup for a reason—it’s simple! Two ingredients: sugar and water (equal parts). I use exactly 1 cup of each.

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2. Pour your 1 cup of water and 1 cup of sugar into a small sauce pot and whisk well—bring to a boil and make sure that the sugar fully dissolves.

3. Once the sugar is dissolved, you want to let it cool for about an hour or two until its at room temperature. Although, if you’re really eager to make the drink and don’t want to wait that long, you don’t have to (guilty of that). Waiting that long just gives the syrup a chanced to become, well, syrup. You want it to thicken.

4. Assuming that your simple syrup is ready, combine 2 oz. of bourbon whiskey, 1.25 oz. of freshly squeezed lemon juice, and 1.25 oz. of the syrup in your cocktail shaker.

5. Add the egg white (you can do this by cracking the egg on the side of the cocktail shaker and sort of cradling the yolk back and forth between the two shells until all of the egg whites have fallen into the shaker).

6. Snap on the lid and give it a dry shake—meaning without ice (yet). Shake it vigorously for about 10 seconds. This gives the egg white a chance to froth up.

7. Add the ice to the cocktail shaker. Shake it again, vigorously, for another 10 seconds.

8. Attach your hawthorne strainer to your cocktail shaker and slowly pour it through the fine-mesh strainer into your coupe glass. Here’s my technique:

Pouring the mix through the fine-mesh strainer (double straining) eliminates the chances for small pieces of pulp or flecks of ice to get into the drink. I tried doing it without a fine-mesh strainer, and it tasted a bit chalky. I think it’s best to double-strain. You get the best product.

Pouring the mix through the fine-mesh strainer (double straining) eliminates the chances for small pieces of pulp or flecks of ice to get into the drink. I tried doing it without a fine-mesh strainer, and it tasted a bit chalky. I think it’s best to double-strain. You get the best product.

9. Voila! You’re done. You can choose to garnish it with some bitters (like I did), a Luxardo cherry, or a lemon twist.

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