Evelyn Negri-Albert

EatsbyEve

Here, you’ll find anything and everything food-related. Cooking and experimenting in the kitchen is something that I’ve been doing all my life, and it brings me so much joy to share my (amateur) knowledge with you.

banana bread

 

I don’t know about you, but I always end up having overly ripe bananas just hanging out in my kitchen. They’re past the point of that perfect balance of firmness and sweetness to eat them by themselves, so what do you do with them? Duh, this answer is too easy.

I’ll put it bluntly—I am not a baker and I’m not sure I’ll ever be. Baking takes a lot of preciseness and patience, whereas with cooking you can be nonchalantly creative. But, for some reason, I’ve mastered this banana bread and has shamelessly become a hit in my household (hint: it’s easy).

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what ya need:

  • 3-4 overly ripe bananas

  • 1/3 cup butter, melted

  • 1 1/2 cup flour

  • 1 teaspoon baking soda

  • 1 teaspoon salt

  • 1 large egg, beaten

  • 1/2 cup sugar (if you aren’t using chocolate chips, use 3/4 cup)

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • 1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate morsels

tools:

  • small mixing bowl

  • medium mixing bowl

  • measuring cups/spoons

  • large serving fork

  • rubber spatula

  • 8x4 inch loaf pan

  • parchment paper

  • cooking spray oil

how to do it:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

  2. Peel the bananas. In a medium mixing bowl, mash the bananas with a fork until they’re nice and consistently mushy.

How do you know when the banana is at the perfect stage of overly ripe?   A lot of recipes tell you that once you see brown spots on the outside, they’re “good enough” to use for banana bread. Honestly though, I think the riper the banana, the better—when the banana ripens, it transforms from a resistant starch to a simple sugar. It brings out the natural sweetness in the banana bread rather than having to add on. It also makes it more moist!

How do you know when the banana is at the perfect stage of overly ripe?

A lot of recipes tell you that once you see brown spots on the outside, they’re “good enough” to use for banana bread. Honestly though, I think the riper the banana, the better—when the banana ripens, it transforms from a resistant starch to a simple sugar. It brings out the natural sweetness in the banana bread rather than having to add on. It also makes it more moist!

3. Add the 1/3 cup of melted butter and mix well.

Tip! I just stick mine into the microwave for about 35 seconds, I know microwave are becoming a lot more obsolete and people are starting so stray away from them, but I will never give mine up—it just saves so much work and time.

Tip! I just stick mine into the microwave for about 35 seconds, I know microwave are becoming a lot more obsolete and people are starting so stray away from them, but I will never give mine up—it just saves so much work and time.

4. In a separate mixing bowl or saucer, crack the egg and beat it evenly with your fork. Set aside.

5. Now for your dry ingredients. In another separate medium mixing bowl, add the flour (1 1/2 cup), baking soda (1 teaspoon), and salt (1/2 teaspoon).

6. Stir in your mushed bananas, the beaten egg, sugar (1/2 cup), and vanilla extract (1 teaspoon). Don’t over mix—this can lead your banana bread to become flat, heavy, and dense.

7. Fold in 1/2 cup of semi-sweet chocolate morsels.

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8. Line the bottom of the loaf pan with a sheet of parchment paper and give it a few sprits with your cooking oil spray (I have a high success rate with coconut oil spray).

9. Pour your banana batter into the loaf pan. I use a pan that is light in color, because the darker the pan, the hotter it gets and the quicker the contents of the pan will burn.

10. Pop that sucker in the oven and let it bake for about 50 minutes, or just until you stick a toothpick in it and it comes out clean.

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You can let it cool completely before serving, but I like to dive right into it when it’s warm. Have it for breakfast for the next few days with a cup of coffee or tea, if you don’t eat it al in one sitting!

You can store your banana bread at room temperature, as long as it is wrapped.  It usually lasts about 3 (maybe 4) days.  Try freezing it!  But make sure it is totally, completely cooled before you wrap it in plastic wrap and put it in the freezer—this can last up to two months!  Don’t forget to date it.


Sources are your friend, and they’re mine too:

  • https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/banana_bread/

  • https://www.twopeasandtheirpod.com/banana-bread/